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Plunge into this guide to get ready for casement windows replacement

When selecting new construction or replacement windows for our homes, we usually set our sights on widespread window styles and frame materials, overlooking less popular but still cost-efficient options like casement units. This type of window configuration is considered the most functional, secure, and long-lasting, meeting the highest ventilation and daylight requirements. These units might be constructed singly or incorporated within a bay window for a more classic style and broader view. If you're looking to introduce stunning changes in the style of your house, consider installing replacement casement windows. They can become a great addition to virtually every room, ensuring broad functionality and exquisite look.

Plunge into this guide to get ready for casement windows replacement

Read on to broaden your knowledge about these windows, not to miss crucial details, and consider all the advantages and downsides they offer. 

What is a casement window?

Also called crank and side-hinge, casement units come with an easy-to-open design that makes them perfect for tight or out-of-reach spaces. They're also commonly installed with other window types in living rooms and master bedrooms. Their operational principle is similar to doors as they are hinged on one side and swing outward in opposite directions with the help of a hinge secured to the frame. Thanks to an operable crank, replacement casement windows are smooth to open and close, meaning you can regulate the airflow to

These windows look appropriate and harmonious in any interior. You can pick a window with a large pane of glass for a contemporary style or add a grille pattern for a traditional one. Either way, you can rest assured that you will get ample light entering your house.

What are the standard casement window sizes?

The standard width of casement windows is between 1 foot, 2 inches, and 2 feet, 11.5 inches, while their height ranges between 2 feet, 5.5 inches to 6 feet and 5.5. inches. 

See the table below to find out standard casement window sizes.

1714                         1-foot, 7 inches wide               1-foot, 4 inches high              
1725 1-foot, 7 inches wide 2 feet, 5 inches high
2323 1-foot, 7 inches wide 2 feet, 3 inches high
2929 2 feet, 9 inches wide 2 feet, 9 inches high
3525 3 feet, 5 inches wide 2 feet, 5 inches high

What are the basic types of replacement casement windows

Aside from being weather resistant and functional, side-hinge windows are also versatile. They come in various styles and configurations, including fixed, push-out, double- and single-framed ones. Let us focus separately on each of the available new casement window types:

  • Single-frame casement windows

Crank windows with a single frame are the most sought-after ones of this configuration. They are reasonably priced and offer extra ventilation in hard-to-reach places like over the tubs in bathrooms or over the sinks in kitchens. 

  • Double casement windows

Also referred to as French ones, casements with two panes are opened from the center, much like French doors. These units come with wide panes and look especially attractive in the center of a spacious living, dining, or family room, offering a great view, ample sunlight, and airflow. 

  • Push-out casement windows

Casement windows with a push-out mechanism are especially convenient in difficult-to-access areas of the house. They're operated by turning a lever and pushing the glass outwards, not taking space inside the room. Push-out casement windows are available in both single- and double-pane configurations. 

  • Fixed

The most energy-efficient casement windows, though, are fixed ones. If installed by a professional contractor, they ensure reliable performance, remaining airtight for years. Some set casement units may have mock sashes to match the style of other operable windows. 

Where does a casement window installation make the most sense?

Casements are one of the best windows from the point of convenience. They open and close inwards with the light turn of a handle. A casement window can become a great way out of dark spaces with a lack of natural light, as well as difficult-to-reach areas. 

Here are the best areas for installing casement windows in your house: 

  • Areas that are difficult to reach, like over a tub or a kitchen sink
  • Places where ventilation is a must, like bathrooms and bedrooms
  • Spaces where you want to enjoy the comfort and wonderful views without any obstructions, like living and bedrooms. 

Besides, casement units are used to add ventilation to large window configurations. You can commonly see them installed together with picture, bay, or bow windows. 

How much does a casement window cost?

First, we should discuss the factors affecting the cost of replacing casement units. From your region and local labor rates to the selected window brand, size, and frame materials - all these factors make casement window prices vary from $550 to $1.200. This includes the cost of both window materials and professional installation, which runs about $28 to $60 per window installed. Most homeowners throughout the country pay around $785 for a 25 x 60 casement window with a wooden frame and low-emissive glass. 

 Type of cost                                                                     Cost                                                                
Low-end $550
Average $785
High-end $1.200

The cost to install casement windows can also vary on their type, as each offers a slightly different design and functionality. Single casement units are the most affordable ones as they narrow and come with one pane set into a frame. You should expect to spend around $310 per casement window of this configuration. French casements with two sashes set side-by-side have better performance and view than their single-hung counterparts. They allow more natural light and air in the room and look relevant in classic and traditional designs. The cost of casement windows of this type ranges from $445 to $585 per unit. And, finely, the most pricey variation of casement windows is the picture window with casement flankers. These units are hybrids of casements and picture windows, giving you the best of both worlds - an ample flow of air and natural light and a breathtaking panoramic view. Be ready to pay around $750 - $900 for a picture window with casement flankers.

 Type of window                                                                         Cost                                                                
Single casement window $224 - $370
French casement window $445 - $585
Picture window with casement flankers $750 - $900

Another factor that affects casement window replacement costs is frame material. Windows of this style come with frames made of different materials, from vinyl to wood and aluminum ones. Each has distinctive features that affect the cost, including service life, insulation properties, and style. See the table below to check what pricing to expect from the most common materials:

 Frame material type                                                                        Cost                                                                
Wood $300- $2.000
Vinyl $200 - $750
Aluminum $300 - $950
Fiberglass $530 - $1.600

If you have already decided on the casement window option you're about to install, consider finding a local professional who can help you out with that. There are a few options for hiring a reliable window contractor. You can either refer to a window manufacturer where you buy your new casement unit or select among local installers who have the corresponding certification. The quickest option, though, is to hire a window installer through HomeQuote. We minimized the time of request processing, and now it takes less than a day to provide you with estimates from up to 5 professionals operating in the selected region. 

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